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We’re all guilty of it. We’ve all stood in front of the size section at the store and asked, “What size do I need?” – but as many people have learned the hard way, this is not an easy question to answer! The best thing you can do is educate yourself on how to determine what size HVAC you need before you go shopping for one. This blog post will cover everything from choosing a heat pump or air conditioner to sizing your unit based on square footage website .

How large is your home? Is it just a one-bedroom apartment or does the house have an attic, basement, and garage too? Measure each room in feet to find out how much space you’ve got service areas

The unit used to measure the energy needed for cooling and heating is called a British thermal unit, or BTU. One square foot of your home roughly requires 25 BTUs in order to be cooled off using air conditioning. For example, if you have an 1800 square-foot house then that’s going to cost about 3125 BTUs per hour which will run at approximately $110-$140 depending on how much time they spend doing it each day.

If your home has a very high ceiling, you can multiply the base BTU amount by 1.25 to find out how much more of this heat-producing energy source is needed for comfort in that space. For example: If an AC unit with 1500 square feet and average 8-foot ceilings would need about 37,500 BTUs – but if it had 12-foot ceilings instead? That same size room would require 50% more power!

One of the most important considerations when choosing an air conditioning unit is its tonnage. Tonnage refers to a measure that tells you how much cooling power your AC can produce in 24 hours, and it’s essential to choose one with enough capacity for your room size – too little means not only won’t be cooled properly but also could overload circuits or break down more quickly. If you’re looking at units less than 130 sq feet, 1 ton should do just fine; however, if 185 square foot space looks about right for what you need then go ahead and upgrade to a 2-ton model instead since they’ll run more efficiently over time (plus there are other benefits like increased airflow).

An AC’s level of energy efficiency determines how much power it will use. Star ratings are assigned by the Bureau of Energy Efficiency and help you gauge an appliance’s potential to lower your electricity bill; a 5-star rating is higher quality than 1 star, which means that in general, more stars mean better performance (less money spent on running costs). Inverters offer another way for consumers to enjoy efficient cooling without giving up such high levels of air conditioning capacity.

If you live in a warm climate, it may seem like the best choice is to replace your AC with one that has no dehumidification capabilities. But if this happens, all of those moisture-laden hot air particles will come into contact and interact with each other more often than they would have otherwise been able to do outside an enclosed space. This leads not only to high humidity levels but also puts out huge amounts of heat – which means your cooling costs are going up exponentially!

With the variety of subtle innovations these days, ACs come with a wide range of features that can be considered in your decision. Features like Sleep Mode and an auto-cleaning feature to keep moisture away are perfect for more low maintenance homes while Quick Cool could make all the difference on those hot summer nights. For places where there are often mosquitoes buzzing around, Mosquito Away may be worth investing in just so you don’t have to worry about being bit every time sitting outside at night!

The most important part of installing your HVAC system is to make sure you get it right the first time. You should be able to trust that any dealer or installer will have all the necessary training and equipment, but if you can’t find a reputable company locally, then we suggest using one out-of-state who has trained technicians nationwide. The last step in installation for an air conditioning unit (or heater) is choosing which technician will do the job best. It’s crucial not only to know what type of work they’re qualified for–they also need experience with different models so that they’ll install yours correctly without having trouble later on down the line by trying something new when this model isn’t their specialty.

There are a lot of things to consider when choosing an HVAC system for your home. To help you understand the three variables that will be most important in this decision, we’ve provided information about insulation values and square footage as well as geographic location. Take some time to explore these pages and then come back here with more questions or concerns! We know how frustrating it can be not knowing enough about something before making a purchase; let us make sure you have all the knowledge necessary before buying any type of HVAC equipment by contacting our experts privacy policy.